Jeti Jeti

This Ghanaian fisherman's song celebrates them bringing their catch back to market to sell, so they're happy to have money to spend. I simplified this version slightly from the original which Yaw Asumada taught me, which had a 12/8 drumming intro which was not so easy to sing and play at the same time. Instead, we begin with percussion and voices, like how Kakatsitsi sing it on their song "Sea Never Dry" from their 1998 album 'Etxo Mia Dogo' (although they only sing the lines below once, as part of a longer song - check it out for a great lesson in groove...! :)

>140bpm 4/4 ||:1 & 2 & 3 & 4 & :||
                           $
Claps       || X...........X... ||   ("One ... Four")

Bell 1      || X..X..X...X.X... ||   (3:2 clave part)
Bell 2      || ......X...X...X. ||   (traditional Ghanaian bell part)

                     >   >   >
Guiro       || xxxxx.Xxx.Xxx.Xx ||
               rlrlr rlr rlr rl      (r=downstroke, l=upstroke)

Bell 2 is also covered by the Guiro/Scraper part, so can be left out if short of players.

Song

Call:       Ay yeh min ee eh bah
Response:   Eh bah eh ay yeh longo beh

Call:       Ooh ah tinti no nah meno
Response:   Oh na mi

Call:       Ay yeh min ee eh bah
Response:   Eh bah eh ay yeh longo beh

Call:                  Ee eh bah
Response:   Eh bah eh ay yeh longo beh

The first two verses can be repeated as many times as desired, then the last verse loops round quickly with the shortened Call, before launching into the drumming. Here's the tune written out along with two harmonies:

Call:     Ay yeh min ee e-h  bah
          G-|C---b-  a- e-G- f---|

Response:    Eh  bah eh  ay yeh longo beh
Harmony 2   |C---a---g---e- G- |G- G- c...........|................|
Harmony 1   |G---f---e---d- E- |E- E- c...........|................|
Melody      |E---d---c---b- C- |C- C- c...........|................|

Call: Ooh ah tinti no nah meno
       G- G-|G--G--A- g---e-F-|

Response:      Oh na mi
Harmony 2   |..E--F--e---G-G-|
Harmony 1   |..C--D--c---G-G-|
Melody      |..G--A--g---G-G-|

Offbeat Variation:    Ooh-o tintintintin oh nah meno
            |...........G-G-G|-G- G- G-  A- g-- e-F-|
             1 & 2 & 3 & 4 &  1 &  2  &   3  &  4 & 

Main Rhythm

>140bpm 4/4 ||:1 & 2 & 3 & 4 & :||
Kpanlogo 1  || B.OOO.O.BO.OO.O. ||
               r lrl r lr lr l

Kpanlogo 2  || Z...Z...OO.OO... ||   ("I like fishing the sea")
                       rl lr
                              $
Kpanlogo 3  || SOOSS..SSOOSS..S ||   ("I like to row my boat")
               rlrlr  lrlrlr  l

>140bpm 4/4 ||:1 & 2 & 3 & 4 &  | 5 & 6 & 7 & 8 & :||
Atumpan 1   || X...D........... | D...D........... ||   ("Click, 2, ... 5, 6")
Atumpan 2   || DDDDD...DDDDD... | DDDDD...X...X... ||   ("Rub-a-dub-a-dub" x3)
Atumpan 3   || X...d...D..D..D. | ..DDD.D.X...X... ||

Ideally the above percussion parts continue if there are enough players.

In the absence of Ghanaian Kpanlogo+Atumpan drums, you could instead use Djembe+Dununba. We often double up Kpanlogo 3 using Kenkeni+Sangban for S+O.

If you only have one Atumpan (Master Drum) player, they are free to repeat the three patterns as many times as desired before moving onto the next one, or improvising. Alternatively, a few players could do the patterns in unison, which is lots of fun, repeating each one an agreed number of times (ideally four), before changing to the next one.

Notice that the fast Kpanlogo 1 part is made up of two halves which are the same each time apart from one note which moves, and that your hands will swap over as it's so fast that you need to use next-hand technique:

               r lrl r
Kpanlogo 1  || B.OOO.O. +
               BO.OO.O. ||
               lr lr l

Ending

Count       || 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 &  | 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 &  ||
Signal      || p..SS.S.S...p.p. | p..OOOS..OOOS... || +

After a final echauffement, the leader plays the Signal over the other parts, then everyone answers together with:

All Drums   || p..SS.S.S...p.p. | p                ||